"Chaikune" the people from the forest
For years I have been documenting the Shipibo-Conibo native people from the Peruvian Rainforest. On July 2017 they took me deep into the Rainforest to their place of origin, the Koman Kenia lake. There I had the chance to understand their imaginary even better. In this place I got to know the enchanted people, the true guardians of Nature.
Kene: the Shipibo-Conibo pattern

Kene, in the language of the Shipibo-Conibo people, means the drawing of your path. Before the Shipibos met the Incas and learn to use cotton to weave, they drew the Kene on their bodies. Hands, chest, face and feet, for a special and mysterious purpose. With it, they lived related to the forest. 
There are many books about the Kene, many people interested and hundreds of anthropologists that have interpreted and talk about it. But still, so little we know about the Kene. The Kene reveals their « cosmovision », the knowledge and the aesthetic. With more than 35 000 individuals, they represent the most popular tribe of the Peruvian rainforest.
The art of the Kene traditionally belongs to women. It is not about drawings portraying landscapes, animals or people. The geometrics lines of the Kene first originate in the world of the mind by showing themselves through visions or dreams before appearing to the physical world.
The elders say the Kene is the musical drawing of your path. Each one is unique. All the drawings take root from the spots that are present on the snakes’ skin called Ronin, the anaconda and guardian of the water. Ronin is the major figure of their « cosmovision » .
Ani-Xeati : the Shipibo-Conibo culture celebration

The "Ani Xeati" took place on the 2, 3 & 4 of November 2017 at the Caco-Macaya community in the Peruvian Rainforest. 
This is a traditional indigenous reunion from the Shipibo-Conibo people, organized for the first time in more than 10 years. 
They reunited to share their dances and music with a huge drum made of a tree trunk. There was also the traditional "masato" a drink made of manioc, served on beautiful pottery. The art of Kené was aso exhibited on their skins and clothes. 
The common will is to put the Shipibo Elders together to preserve memory and to transmite to the next generations.
Portraits
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